The Truth on School Life & Successful Students

The Truth on School Life & Successful Students

In this episode of Season 3 of the Stay Calm, Don’t Panic! Podcast, Chris Robey talks to two school counselors about what they are currently seeing in our public schools. While Lindsey and Tammy both work at two very different schools, they give great insight into what students are facing and offer valuable advice on how we can support teenagers in order to make their school experiences more positive. School is a vital part of the teenage years, let’s discuss how we can help students be more successful!

4 Tips to Parent Smarter

4 Tips to Parent Smarter

This post was originally titled “Parenting Isn’t for Everyone,” but that sounded a little too negative. That said, it is still true; however, it is also true that anyone can benefit from parenting if they choose to commit to the path of parenting. Does that seem confusing? Let me try to come at it this way. It is possible for everyone to be a parent. We see this all around us. The act of, or result of an act, that ends in being a parent happens all the time. The difference is that some people choose to continue on the parenting path and others choose to quit.

The 5 “A’s” of Connection

The 5 “A’s” of Connection

In this episode of the Stay Calm, Don’t Panic! Podcast, Chris Robey is joined by Beverly Ross to discuss how we can increase our connection with teenagers. Beverly offers five practical, realistic ways to increase our connection and improve our relationships. As an expert in the counseling realm, Beverly’s wisdom is invaluable! Let’s work on making our homes, classrooms and churches safe places for connection!

A Few Words on Courage

A Few Words on Courage

Teenagers, of all the people in this world, are positioned well to live with courage. For the most part, people don’t depend on them for their livelihood, so they can explore, make mistakes, and pivot when necessary. Within the bounds of the law, the consequences for failing tend to be less than adults who have families and careers. Teenagers tend to see the world with more naive and hopeful eyes – issues that can be solved or addressed with just one good idea. While those who are older roll their eyes and pat on the head – teenagers seem to expect their actions to actually make a difference and change environments.

4 Ways the “Check-In” Transforms Relationships

4 Ways the “Check-In” Transforms Relationships

In this first episode of Season 3 of the Stay Calm, Don’t Panic! Podcast, Chris sits down with Dr. Mark DeYoung to talk about the importance and power of the check-in. Talking to teenagers is about more than just getting information, it can build relationships and help them find their own identity. You don’t want to miss these tips on how to make the most of the check-in!

Learning to Unplug as a Family

Learning to Unplug as a Family

This post was originally written by Sarah Brooks for her blog over at Life as of Late. Her blog is a great (and hilarious) commentary on parenting little ones, but she also has a unique and honest perspective on parenting teenagers in a digital world. We wanted to share this post here because we love the heart and suggestions behind this blog, BUT we also wanted to share this so you will head over to her blog and give her some love. If you are struggling with how to parent in the midst of Snapchat, Instagram and other social media site, she is your gal and her posts on social media will change your life! Thanks for sharing your wisdom with us, Sarah! //

Junior high is a rough time. It’s awkward, it’s pimply…you’re trying to figure out who you are and where you belong. You’re trying not to panic about your body parts that are growing and doing weird, new things. Junior high is a lot of social experimentation. Not necessarily experimenting with drugs and alcohol, more like experimenting with friendships. Learning what is kind vs. what hurts people’s feelings. Learning what traits draw others in vs. alienate the general population. Learning the difference between high-energy and just plain obnoxious. I wouldn’t wish my junior high self on my worst enemy.